Foot Posture and Foot Pain – What is the Link?

When it comes to foot posture, people can get quite confused. And rightly so, at TFC Podiatry Point Cook we get a lot of questions about Foot posture. With foot posture being a complex area to understand. Particularly when it comes to trying to link it in with the injury that you have. There are two extremes of foot posture, so we have a high arch foot type and a low arched foot type, and there are lots of variables in between. The ankle joint is a very complex joint because it moves in three planes of movement and this is different to any other joint in the body. This is what allows us to walk on two feet. So the first foot posture is a low arch foot type or a flat foot posture. With this foot posture, it’s technically known as a pronated foot type, everted foot type, or a pes planus foot type.

There are varying levels of this foot posture and there’s also varying levels of discomfort, injuries and pains that we see. Some people will be symptomatic and have pain, whereas others with the same foot type might not be. One of the things that is common all across the board is that this foot posture has a low arch profile during the walking cycle. So a loss of the arch height while a person’s walking. One of the other characteristics is the heel tilting inwards, and we can often see from the rear foot or from the back of the foot that the foot sitting in a slightly external position, so we can often see too many toes or we have a toe drift. One of the other things that can happen with this type of foot posture is we get external rotation of the tibia and internal rotation of the femur. So it changes the dynamics of how our lower limb functions during our walking cycle.

The other type of foot posture that we see quite commonly is a high arch foot type. So this is technically known as a supinated foot posture, an inverted foot posture, and a pes cavus foot top posture. So again, there’s different levels of this condition or this type of foot posture. And across the board, what’s usually seen as a very high arch foot type. We can also usually see the heel tilting outwards and we can see that the foot tends to load up more on the outside border of the foot. So we get more loading through the lateral column of the foot. With this foot type, we get internal rotation of the tibia and external rotation of the femur. And again, it changes the dynamics of how the lower limb functions during our walking cycle.

Foot postures are a spectrum across many joints, this area of study is called biomechanics.

There are two extremes of foot posture, so we have a high arch foot type and a low arched foot type, and there are lots of variables in between. The ankle joint is a very complex joint because it moves in three planes of movement and this is different to any other joint in the body. This is what allows us to walk on two feet. So the first foot posture is a low arch foot type or a flat foot posture. With this foot posture, it’s technically known as a pronated foot type, everted foot type, or a pes planus foot type.

There are varying levels of this foot posture and there’s also varying levels of discomfort. Some people will be symptomatic and have pain, whereas others might not be. with this type of foot posture, one of the things that is common all across the board is that this foot posture has a low arch profile during the walking cycle. So a loss of the arch while a person’s walking. One of the other characteristics is the heel tilting inwards, and we can often see from the rear foot or from the back of the foot that the foot sitting in a slightly external position, so we can often see too many toes or we have a tow drift. One of the other things that happens with this type of foot posture is we get external rotation of the tibia and internal rotation of the femur. So it changes the dynamics of how our lower limb functions during our walking cycle.

The other type of foot posture that we see quite commonly is a high arch foot top. As Podiatrist we look at trying to link these mechanical factors of your movement with your pain. We refer to these are risk factors or causative factors for injury and these risk factors are what we use to treat foot, ankle and leg pain.