How do I prevent Injuries while running?

Injury Free Running and Sports Podiatry

Yesterday I completed the Run Melbourne 1/2 Marathon, as a Podiatrist who deals with injured patients, it has become a focus to run pain free and to push myself to the limit.

First of all, I would like to recommend the Run Melbourne Festival for anyone looking for an enjoyable endurance race. Run Melbourne is a large festival featuring a 6km, 10km and 21.1km half marathon race. It is a busy day set in Melbourne CBD with the majority of the race, local to the Melbourne Botanical gardens. It is busy in that it can get a little congested, particularly if you are not in the right race wave and looking to do a lot of overtaking. However the benefits of the constant distractions of your competitors and local businesses looking to entertain you while running make the day a worthwhile, fun event.

Injury free running is the holy grail for athletes of all levels, however there are many factors in reducing your risk of getting injured. There are many “rules” that work to decrease your chances of injury however they can be difficult to implement into your weekly workout plans. The 10% rule is often quoted with increasing your running cadence and it is often considered important that your weekly training load is at least greater than the run itself.

However it is likely that you will get aches and pain from sport at some point in your career, the importance is listening to these aches and pains as warning signs for injuries that may be around the corner and learning how to decrease the load on the tissue that is warning you. Ways of changing load on tissue include simple things such as changing your shoes or decreasing your load to changing your pace, foot striking patterns or cadence.

If you at worried about a pain that is not subsiding seeing someone for an assessment can be enough to arm you with the information that you need to run pain free.